Music

Our second and third EPs, Bring The Good Times Back and Didn’t Kiss You This Christmas, are out now.

Bring The Good Times Back is available on all your favourite streaming and download services here.

Our Christmas EP, Didn’t Kiss You This Christmas, is available from the same services here.

And our debut EP, Some People Are Inconvenient, is available here.

You’ll also find all our EPs on Bandcamp and on Soundcloud.

Bring The Good Times Back EP

Bring The Good Times Back‘s four songs are united by a single theme: rage.

The collection begins with the pointedly post-punk 1979, a howl of fury about generations of politicians who “sow poison instead of seeds” and “rip the heart from the state and the life from the towns”.

Carrie sings about a different kind of politics in the percussive, propulsive Loving Me Is A Political Act, where she articulates the fear that many LGBT+ people know all too well: that holding their loved one’s hand in public “will end as headlines”. The song becomes a proud, defiant love letter to the people whose “hearts are bigger than the sky.” It’s followed by the outsider anthem Battlecry, a rallying cry for the marginalised: “back us into a corner and we fight back.”

The collection ends with the devastating 72. Over haunting e-bow and rumbling bass Carrie skewers the officials responsible for the Grenfell Tower fire.

Didn’t Kiss You This Christmas EP

Singer Carrie set herself a challenge for this one: write a Christmas EP that didn’t suck. This is the result.

Opener Didn’t Kiss You This Christmas dances through puddles under Christmas lights, while the mournful Christmas In Calton is a song of sadness and separation.

In the closing A Christmas Prayer, Carrie sings of the lost and the lonely and “the ones that didn’t make it through”.

Some People Are Inconvenient EP

Here’s what the nice people at Is This Music had to say about our debut, Some People Are Inconvenient.

‘Safe Space’ is an emotionally-charged, enormodome-ready epic, its searing guitars and soaring vocals a match for the rock behemoths that regularly fill our sporting arenas (dare we say U2 in these enlightened times?)

However, as the trio’s biog says, they’re “having too much fun to stick to a single genre.”

Thus, opener ‘Voodoo’s choppy grunge would be more at home in a sweaty club, while ‘A Moment of Clarity’s spidery guitar takes towards the post-rock realm, except with a swelling, chest-beating chorus, and with ‘Bonesaw’ we’re briefly, for a breathless two minutes, back in a basement where Bob Mould wields an axe and Stadium* the industrial machinery.